Saturday, March 27, 2010

Who Needs Fathers?


Entitled "Who Needs Fathers?", a new 3-part TV series begins this Wednesday on BBC2, looking at children issues following their parents' separation. Described by the BBC as: "A major series to mark 20 years since the passing of the Children Act", the programme will investigate whether the 'key principle' of the Act is being adhered to - that in family breakdown and divorce, the welfare of the child is paramount.

Should be worth a watch.

An article in The Telegraph today discusses the issues raised by the series.

10 comments:

  1. Nick Langford27 March 2010 16:10

    To be followed no doubt by a further series, "Who Needs a Brain?" - We follow the exploits of four government ministers who have had their brains surgically removed in a desperate bid to reduce global warming.

    Then in the autumn we shall be treated to a 12 part series, "Who Needs the BBC?"

    ReplyDelete
  2. who needs fathers? per se, nobody. if you have love and support it doesn't matter where it comes from. and on a straw poll of those i happen to know, lots of those raised by women have a wonderful lack of aggression. it is totally a straw poll though. please don't start analysing it like i put it forward as some great theory of child-rearing.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Recently we have been finding that there is a lot more searching for information on this subject, together with fathers' rights on the internet. The dabate is so subjective that it must be hard to take a general approach.

    ReplyDelete
  4. If you pay high child support (as I do and all nrps are supposed to), then you should be able to see your children whenever you like and vice versa.

    When you let the politicians and Judges and spcial workers loose on the children then they are in trouble as they are here, big time.

    I will probably not watch it as through the Telegraph article and my appearances and experiences of court mean I know how reluctant these places are to enforce decent contact on-going.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Parental Alientation is not something that should be dismissed. It is a damaging act of selfish control by one parent and can destroy a loving relationship between father and child beyond repair. as someone who is currently suffering from this, the frustration and upset is imeasurable and i hope this series highlights this problem fully. Just because parents want a fresh life apart,doesn't mean that life should be without one's children. it is a real problem and one that leaves loving father's helpless for years.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This programme reinforces the fact there are fathers who in the end will give up the "fight" to see their children. This is not because they are rejecting or no longer love their children but because these fathers are mentally, physically and emotionally exhausted because of the many hoops that they have to jump through to just see their children.
    From experience, a manipulative ex wife brainwashes the children to make them believe themselves that they no longer want to see their father. This is then totally ignored by the courts, judges and social workers. These "professionals" are too scared to stand up to the mother and are then seen to bend over backwards for her. The system protects the mother and not the best interests of the children. The Childrens' Act should be renamed and called The Mothers' Act.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Yes parental alienation is VERY real, it's so sad that a so called 'loving parent' brainwashes the child/children against the other parent, it has happened to us too, the mother is the alienating parent and a narcissistic person

    ReplyDelete
  8. MATCH means Mothers Apart From Their Children. The website could be of interest. Mothers also, at times, have bad treatment too.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I am a mother who is on the receiving end of a father who is doing his best to limit the time the children spend with me even though there is a Shared Residency Order in place. He is refusing to agree to any kind of additional time with the children despite reassurances given by him to the Judge about ensuring that the children have plenty of time with me. Fathers can also behave very badly towards the mothers and can try to alienate the mothers too. Don't forget that historically it was the fathers who had full custody and often refused to allow the mothers to see their children.

    ReplyDelete
  10. My ex-wife took my two early teenage daughters, alienating them against me such that they would not see me or my family but only demanded money. I became traumatised, unable to enter the bedrooms which remained as they had left them, fearful of the post arriving etc..

    After four years I became close to a woman who expressed great empathy for the trauma I had experienced. She helped me to come to terms with it, the bedrooms were purged and redecorated. She promised to be with me forever, as I did to her. Eventually we decided to have a child and bring him up together as a family to help me heal. My son is now 3, my partner has left saying the relationship is over and taking my son who I have now not seen for months. This experience has reopened the past trauma with more than doubled severity. Anybody who belittles an intention to take one's own life under similar circumstances (and I am aware these are not unique) has little understanding of the agony.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to comment on this post. Constructive comments are always welcome, even if they do not coincide with my views! Please note, however, that comments will be removed or not published if I consider that:
* They are not relevant to the subject of this post; or
* They are (or are possibly) defamatory; or
* They breach court reporting rules; or
* They contain derogatory, abusive or threatening language; or
* They contain 'spam' advertisements (including links to any commercial websites).
Please also note that I am unable to give advice.

Note: only a member of this blog may post a comment.