Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Unique fly-on-the–wall TV documentary gives insight into how family mediation can settle disputes

Jane Robey
Money, children and property disputes into national spotlight

Millions of TV viewers will have the chance to watch the private world of family mediation with the launch of a ground-breaking three-part BBC Two ‘fly on the wall’ documentary series.

For over a year, TV cameras, rig and crews were given exclusive access to mediation sessions carried out by leading charity, National Family Mediation (NFM). The resulting series, ‘Mr v Mrs: Call The Mediator’, which kicks off on Tuesday 21 June at 9pm, will allow viewers to watch mediators and separating couples working together to negotiate solutions over money, children and property.

With NFM delivering an average of 16,000 mediations per year and 89 percent of cases closing successfully, it can be an intense but effective process - as the separated couples make plans together, face-to-face, with the help of a skilled mediator. Using a hybrid of between mediation sessions and at home, the series will allow viewers to see how families deal with the practical and emotional reality of the changes they agree upon.

“The 'traditional' route for separating couples to make arrangements over money, children and property has been to head off to a solicitor to prepare for a court room fight, but family mediation for separating couples is quicker, cheaper and less stressful. It helps families to focus on their future needs,” says Jane Robey, NFM’s Chief Executive. “As England and Wales’ leading provider, we are keen to help people understand how the process works.

“Our mediators and couples have granted privileged access to viewers to see a process that is usually kept behind closed doors, as couples work out long-term solutions that help them keep control of their own destinies, instead of handing it over to lawyers and judges.

“The series will provide a unique insight into an element of modern British family life rarely seen by others.”

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